Journey Home: Nicaragua and Honduras

On Sunday, July 31st we started our drive back home to Austin. We’re driving mostly on the weekends, since Emily needs to work, so we’ll be taking about six weeks to get home. Our planned arrival date in Austin is September 18.

Day one of the journey started out great. The drive to the border was fairly long, but easy. Exiting Costa Rica was no problem — we ran ahead of the huge group of Tica Bus passengers, presented the appropriate papers for ourselves and the car, and got through the border without incident. It was a rather unceremonious farewell to Costa Rica.

Our entry into Nicaragua was a little trickier. It turns out that the people who are there to help with processing paperwork at the border are authorized, but authorized doesn’t mean free. We did get through the whole process of temporarily importing the car, passing through immigration, and getting a certification from the vet for Penny and Theda to enter the country pretty quickly, but we also got taken for a bit of a ride. That won’t happen again.

We also had a bit of trouble exiting the border area when an agent noticed that we didn’t have a front license plate. That plate was stolen a couple weeks ago, but we played sorta dumb (I’m good at that) and after some conversations with a few officials, we got border boss-level permission to enter Nicaragua with only one license plate. Phew!

Even with all of that messing around, the border crossing took less than two hours, which we count as a major success. We rolled into Granada at about 3:30 p.m. and got settled in our cozy & comfortable room at the Hotel Casa San Francisco. I was familiar with this place because I stayed at a casita owned by the owners of the hotel when I visited Granada earlier this year. The hotel is just a few blocks from Calle La Calzada, which has a few pedestrian-only blocks lined with many restaurants and street performers. We enjoyed the walkability of the city, which led to our car being parked on the street the whole time we were there. Each night, we payed a guard a couple bucks to watch the car, which is common practice in these cities where petty theft is apparently common.

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A park I found in Granada about a kilometer from our hotel. It was an important find, since these walled Spanish colonial cities lack abundant green space for the dogs to relieve themselves. 

On Tuesday, August 2nd, we relocated to León, which put us within two hours of the Honduras border. We found a room on AirBnB at Hostal El Nancite, which is a guesthouse run by John, a talkative expat from NYC and his Nica wife. Emily and I enjoyed being near the center of action – close to the León Cathedral, a great bakery/restaurant called Pan y Paz, and other restaurants and attractions. One of our most enjoyable meals was procured from the ladies grilling various meats and other savory delights behind the cathedral at the edge of the market. Paired with some Costa Rican beer, it was a fairly perfect dinner.

After a few days in León we packed up and proceeded to barrel through Honduras in just two days. We crossed the border on Friday, August 5 after talking to lots of officials, waiting for the customs officials to get back from lunch, and jumping through all the hoops. (Honduras wants so many copies of documents! Where do they all go?) We spent one night in Tegucigalpa at a Hyatt in the equivalent of The Domain in Austin — a fancy-time mall-like area with hip restaurants (and Chili’s) and condos. We had a great night there, including a tasty meal at the nearby wine bar and a cocktail at the hotel’s rooftop bar.

 

We rolled out of Tegucigalpa on Saturday morning. After getting lost in the city a couple times (GPS was having trouble), we made our way to Copán Ruinas. This was one of the two nights on the trip that we didn’t have lodging booked in advance. We stopped by the place we stayed on the way down last year, but they were full. After some hunting around, we found a room at Carrillos Hotel, a small, modestly-priced place on the edge of town. It was also conveniently located around the corner from a restaurant specializing in pupusas, a food we’ve recently come to love.

We woke up bright and early on Sunday, loaded up the car, and rolled over to the ruins to make up for missing them on our trip down to Costa Rica last year (“Don’t miss the ruins,” say all the guidebooks). I’m pretty fascinated by ruins and imagine people living out their lives there — at it’s peak, Copán and the surrounding area was home to about 20,000 Mayans. Emily was more into the adjoining scarlet macaw sanctuary, which was really cool. We’d seen these birds flying in pairs from far away, but up close they’re spectacularly beautiful and loud. We have no intention of becoming birders, but if there is such a thing as a “gateway bird,” the scarlet macaw would seem to fit the profile.

After checking the ruins off of our list, we hopped in the car, crossed the border into Guatemala, and arrived in Antigua. We’ve been here for five awesome nights and will hit the road tomorrow to make our way closer to Mexico before making our penultimate border crossing on Sunday.

Antigua anecdotes coming soon!